Introduction to One Health
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Introduction to One Health

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Introduction to One Health: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Planetary Health offers an accessible, readable introduction to the burgeoning field of One Health.

Sharon L. Deem

DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACZM

She is Director of the Institute for Conservation Medicine at the Saint Louis Zoo in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Veterinary College and MPH Program at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri, USA.

Kelly E. Lane-deGraaf

PhD

She is Assistant Professor and Director of the Center for One Health at Fontbonne University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Elizabeth A. Rayhel

PhD

She is Professor and member of the Center for One Health at Fontbonne University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Part I An Introduction and Impetus for One Health 1 Why One Health? 1.1 Book Overview 1.2 Conclusions and Welcome to One Health End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Works Cited 2 Our Interconnected World 2.1 One Health Challenges on a Connected Planet 2.2 Global Challenges for One Health Practitioners 2.2.1 Emerging Infectious Diseases and Invasive Species 2.2.2 Loss of Biodiversity and Natural Resources 2.2.3 Climate Change 2.2.4 Environmental Degradation and Environmental Contaminants 2.2.5 Loss of Habitat and Increased Interactions of Domestic Animals–Wildlife–Humans 2.3 Drivers of Our Connected Health Challenges 2.4 Solutions Using a One Health Approach 2.5 Connectivity Across the Human–Animal–Environment Interface End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited 3 Greatest Threats to Planetary Health 3.1 The Climate Crisis 3.2 Emerging and Re‐emerging Infectious Diseases 3.3 The Loss of Biodiversity 3.3.1 Habitat Loss 3.3.2 Pollution 3.3.3 Invasive Species 3.4 The Anthropocene and Inequality 3.4.1 Wealth and Income Inequality 3.4.2 Global Food Insecurity 3.4.3 Environmental Racism 3.5 Science Denial 3.6 Conclusion End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Works Cited Part II The One Health Triad 4 Environmental Health as One Health 4.1 Threats to Environmental Health 4.2 Pollution and Environmental Contamination 4.3 Habitat Loss and Land Use Alterations 4.4 Environmental Health and Health of the Future 4.5 Two Things Exacerbate Everything 4.5.1 Population Growth and Consumption 4.5.2 Climate Change 4.6 Things Can Get Better 4.7 Conclusion End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited 5 Animal Health as One Health 5.1 Vulture Declines and One Health 5.2 Animals that Share Our Planet 5.3 How Do We Keep All Animals Healthy on a Changing Planet? 5.4 Threats to Animal Health on a Changing Planet 5.5 Conclusions End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited 6 Human Health as One Health 6.1 Human Health as One Health 6.2 Human Disease in the Context of One Health 6.2.1 Infectious Diseases 6.2.2 Disruption of Embryonic and Fetal Development 6.2.3 Diseases of Nourishment 6.2.4 Respiratory Disease 6.2.5 Cancer 6.3 Climate Change and Human Health 6.4 Going Forward End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited Part III Practitioners and Their Tools 7 The One Health Practitioner 7.1 Who Is a One Health Practitioner? 7.2 The Beauty of an Interdisciplinary, Team‐Based Approach 7.2.1 Problem Solving 7.2.2 One Health Is Anticipatory 7.3 Occupational Opportunities in One Health 7.3.1 The One Health Triad 7.3.2 One Health Practitioners and Their Tools 7.3.3 How to Start a Movement 7.3.4 The Humanity of Science 7.4 The Citizen Practitioner End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited 8 Essential Tools for One Health Practitioners 8.1 Why We Need One Health Tools 8.2 The Tools of One Health 8.2.1 The Tangible: Hard Tools of One Health 8.2.2 People Power: The Intangible Tools of One Health 8.2.3 Disease Risk Analyses: Linking the Tangible with the Intangible Tools of One Health 8.3 Tools to Help Start a One Health Movement 8.4 Conclusions End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited Part IV How to Start a Movement 9 Education and Critical Thinking in One Health 9.1 Higher Education and One Health 9.2 One Health Practitioners as Educators 9.3 Conclusions End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited 10 Communication and Advocacy in One Health 10.1 A Hole in the Ozone 10.2 Scientific Communication 10.3 Science Denial and the Cautionary Language of Scientists 10.4 Communication as the Bridge‐Building Tool of One Health 10.5 Communication as Outreach 10.6 Citizen Science as One Health 10.7 Communication and Advocacy as a One Health Tool 10.8 Conclusion End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited Part V The Humanities of One Health 11 Culture and Theology in One Health 11.1 Culture 11.2 Culture, Social Structure, and One Health 11.2.1 Poverty 11.2.2 Marginalization 11.2.3 Women and Gender Equity 11.3 Culture and Animal/Ecosystem One Health 11.4 Religion and One Health 11.5 Cultural and Religious Awareness and One Health End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited 12 Economics and One Health 12.1 Economics: The Connection Between Values and Behaviors 12.2 Cost and Externalities 12.3 The Cost and Value of Life 12.4 The Conundrum of Economics and the Environment 12.5 Business and Sustainability: Patagonia 12.6 Business and Sustainability: New Belgium Brewing 12.7 Global Economics and Planetary Health End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited 13 Politics and Policy of One Health 13.1 What Do We Mean by the Politics of One Health? 13.2 How a Health Issue May Become a Political Issue 13.3 Political Differences, Realities, and Challenges 13.4 Key Local, National, and International One Health Organizations and Movements 13.5 Environmental/Biodiversity 13.5.1 International Climate Accord 13.5.2 International Union for the Conservation of Nature 13.5.3 The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora 13.5.4 United States Environmental Protection Agency 13.6 Animal and Human Health 13.6.1 World Health Organization 13.6.2 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 13.6.3 The World Organization for Animal Health 13.6.4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 13.7 Approaching Health Policies Through the One Health Lens 13.8 Call to Action – Advocacy, Policy, and Politics 13.9 Conclusions End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited Part VI Where Do We Go From Here? 14 Working in a Global Environment 14.1 Think Globally, Act Locally, and the Butterfly Effect 14.2 How a Global Environment Fits in One Health 14.3 Education and Skills Needed to Work and Thrive in a Global World 14.4 How To Be a One Health Practitioner in a Global Environment 14.5 International Programs, Policies, and Laws for One Health in the Global Environment 14.6 Conclusion End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Case Study Works Cited 15 The Past and Future of One Health 15.1 The Lesson of Easter Island 15.2 One Health in History 15.3 How One Health Became One Health 15.4 Our Futures 15.5 Our Current Actions Establish the Path 15.6 The Ethics of Our Decisions 15.7 Conclusions End of Chapter Questions & Activities Interview Works Cited Glossary Index 
9781119382867
  • Idioma Inglés
  • Autor/es Kelly E. Lane-deGraaf
  • Año de edición 2019
  • Nº Páginas 296
  • Encuadernación Soft cover
  • Tamaño 17'8 X 25'1

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